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Sign the petition: Congress: Oppose IMF Assault on Greek Democracy

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Will Congressional Progressives Speak Up on IMF vs. Greece?

UPDATE July 2 2015: The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) is circulating a letter to the IMF, pressing the IMF to back off on its austerity demands in the debt negotiations with Greece. Senator Sanders has signed the letter. The letter has been endorsed by AFL-CIO, Just Foreign Policy, Public Citizen, the Center for Economic and Policy Research, and the Campaign for America's Future.

We want to get as many members of the CPC as possible to sign the letter before it closes at the end of the day TODAY.

If your Rep is a member of the CPC, call them NOW at (202) 224-3121 and say

I urge you to sign the CPC letter urging the IMF to show greater flexibility in the debt negotiations with Greece. The letter closes today.

When you're done, report your call using the form below.

Original Action

Progressives around the world are speaking up against what the International Monetary Fund is doing to Greece. Tens of thousands protested in Athens last night. [1] Their protests have been echoed by Nobel-prize winning US economists Paul Krugman [2] Joseph Stiglitz [3], and by former Archibishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, rejecting the IMF's austerity demands. [4] Yesterday, Working Families [5] and Just Foreign Policy [6] sent alerts calling on President Obama and Congress to stand with Greece against the IMF.

One group of people who haven’t spoken up yet: progressives in Congress. Today, we want to change that. If your Representative is a member of the Congressional Progressive Congress[7], call them now at (202) 224-3121. When you reach a staffer, you can say something like:

“As a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, I urge you to make a public statement against what the IMF is doing to Greece.”

When you're done, report your call below.

References

Could Congress Block Antiworker IMF "Bailouts" in Europe?

Republicans in Congress are trying to block the U.S. Treasury Department from supporting U.S. tax funded International Monetary Fund contributions to the so-called "bailouts" in Europe, which, as economist Mark Weisbrot explains, aren't bailouts for working families at all - for working families, the IMF programs guarantee extreme hardship, and most Europeans would be much better off if these IMF packages collapse - but bailouts of European banks with bad loans.

The purpose of the IMF packages is to force European working families to pay off the banks' bad loans through economic austerity, rather than forcing the banks to take their losses on their bad bets, which would be capitalism, or at least the capitalism they lecture us about it in school and on the nation's op-ed pages when the politically weak are on the chopping block. As we know from the recent Latin American experience, if a country like Greece defaulted on the bad debt and got it over with, economic growth could resume. But the IMF is more of a collection agency for the big banks than an institution concerned with boosting economic growth and employment or reducing poverty.