European Union

1500 Prisoners on Hunger Strike for Basic Rights: Could Hillary Say Boo?

More than 1500 prisoners are currently observing an open-ended hunger strike in defense of basic human rights: the right not to be detained without charge, the right not to be subjected to sustained solitary confinement, the right to be visited by one's family. Two of the prisoners have been on hunger strike for more than 70 days and have been widely reported to be "near death."

Is it possible that U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton could say a few words about this situation?

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon finally said something under pressure. So did the European Union. The International Committee of the Red Cross and Human Rights Watch have spoken up. There was a report in the New York Times; before that, there was a report in the Washington Post.

But so far, Secretary of State Clinton hasn't said boo. Is it impossible that she could say something?

What might happen if a bunch of Americans tried to put pressure on Hillary to speak up?

Europeans Freeze Assets Linked to Deposed Tunisian President. What About US?

Last Friday, popular protests over unemployment and corruption forced Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali to resign after 23 years in power. A Tunisian prosecutor has opened an investigation into the overseas assets of Ben Ali and his family, much of which are widely believed to be the fruit of corruption, and some of which the Tunisian government may try to recover. France, Switzerland, and Germany have all announced the freezing of assets linked to the Ben Ali clan; the European Union is considering doing so.

But the U.S. has made no such announcement, and the issue of U.S. support for Tunisian efforts to track and possibly recover these assets hasn't, to my knowledge - and I've been searching for it, and asking reporters and others about it - even been mentioned in the press. Shouldn't the US also move to freeze any assets in the U.S. linked to the Ben Ali clan, and indicate its full support for Tunisian efforts to recover stolen assets?

On Wednesday, the Tunisian prosecutor's office moved to investigate overseas bank accounts, real estate and other assets held by Ben Ali, his wife Leila Trabelsi and other relatives, while Switzerland froze assets linked to Ben Ali and 40 people in his entourage. On Saturday, France announced that it was blocking "suspicious financial movements concerning Tunisian assets." Germany has also announced moves to freeze the assets of Ben Ali's family.

"Palestinian Gandhi" Convicted for Protesting; U.S. Silent

This week, an Israeli military court convicted Abdallah Abu Rahmah, whom progressive Zionists have called a "Palestinian Gandhi," of "incitement" and "organizing and participating in illegal demonstrations" for organizing protests against the confiscation of Palestinian land by the "Apartheid Wall" in the village of Bilin in the West Bank, following an eight month trial, during which he was kept in prison.

The European Union issued a protest. But as far as I am aware, no U.S. official has said anything and no U.S. newspaper columnist has denounced this act of repression; indeed, the U.S. press hasn't even reported the news. To find out what happened, someone could search the wires where they'll find this AFP story, or go to the British or Israeli press.

AFP reported: